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Discussion Starter #1
So this is actually for a 2001 Dodge van that I use for work, but it's all the same stuff as our LH vehicles. To replace the ignition cylinder can any shop install a new one set to your existing keys? I won't be doing this myself, work will take it to a shop, but I wanted to know if it mattered if I took it to a dealer or private shop.
 

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get off my lawn
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yea both can do it
 

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get off my lawn
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now,, before they tear into this,, you may want tp take the cover off and see if the switch itself is stuck,, the lock tumbler may be fine
 

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Discussion Starter #4
now,, before they tear into this,, you may want tp take the cover off and see if the switch itself is stuck,, the lock tumbler may be fine
Pretty sure it's the tumbler. Before I was driving it the first time it locked up AAA just tapped it with a hammer and dropped the stuck tumbler into place. That and a little WD40 had it working well enough for a couple of months afterwards but now it won't budge.
 

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I just don't get why people think WD-40 is good for anything other than collecting dust.

I would try a good cleaning, lube and possibly a new "punched" key...not cut or ground from an old one.

Supposedly

"Most automotive locks are hardened steel wafers sliding in a hardened steel keyway. They are lubed with waterproof grease. This is unlike many padlocks and home locks, which have ungreased brass parts sliding against steel. These can be usefully lubricated with graphite.

Putting graphite in a greased lock will gum it up. A solvent based spray will redistribute the existing grease, so almost any type will work. An alcohol based lock deicer has the least chance of depositing an incompatible lubricant.
"
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just don't get why people think WD-40 is good for anything other than collecting dust.

I would try a good cleaning, lube and possibly a new "punched" key...not cut or ground from an old one.

Supposedly

"Most automotive locks are hardened steel wafers sliding in a hardened steel keyway. They are lubed with waterproof grease. This is unlike many padlocks and home locks, which have ungreased brass parts sliding against steel. These can be usefully lubricated with graphite.

Putting graphite in a greased lock will gum it up. A solvent based spray will redistribute the existing grease, so almost any type will work. An alcohol based lock deicer has the least chance of depositing an incompatible lubricant.
"
The wd40 wasn't me. I'm not sure if I even own any.

I can try an alcohal based deicer, but I'm wondering if its past that from having the wd40 already in there. I've also tried different keys with the same result.
 
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