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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello so I'm back and the intrepid is still doing good after my rebuild. Yesterday though something weird started happening.

As a preface I did new gasket new filter new fluid on my transmission during the rebuild at 110k. At 114k no leaks whatsoever and has run fine. No slipping proper driving.

However the shifting rod has more resistance and makes noise whenever I shift from park to any gear. The car still drives. Still shifts into every gear just like before the noise. I'm being careful with it might go get food and do more ride sharing with it until it goes limp mode because I need the monies. The noise seems to be coming from the rod I don't hear any gears grinding horridly.

My suspicion is the shift solenoid being bad. I want to run some diagnostics with my multimeter on things. However before I embark on this quest I would like some advice. Peace and Love thanks.
 

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So, when you are moving the shifter from one position to another, it is somewhat difficult to move the shifter, and there is some noise while you are moving the shifter - correct?

If so, you probably need to replace the shifter cable. They can get moisture and corrosion between the cable sheath and cable core and start binding up. If that has started, it doesn't get better, and it will become harder and harder to move. Over time, because of the force that it takes to move the shifter, the shifter pivot point (in the bottom of the shifter) will break, but that will happen only after it becomes very hard to move - so no real hurry, but letting you know that you will need to replace that cable sometime over the next few weeks or couple of months so you're not wearing out or breaking the shifter.

I believe the cable is a "dealer only" item (hopefully they're still available - if not, may try ebay for some new-old stock from a reputable seller - preferably from a Chrysler/Dodge dealer). Or might find a used one that hopefully doesn't have the problem.

But, the shifter should move smoothly with 99% of the resistance to move it coming from the mechanical detents for the shift positions in the shift mechanism inside the transmission - the friction of the shifter and cable should be essentially zero.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Probably wanna do it before it starts getting cold. Did all 4 struts when it was cold and had to take inside breaks because it was too cold for my hands.

Peva I salute you for coming around here for us older gens. I get comments from people on the sidewalk sometimes saying "I ain't ever seen a car unique like that." Granted my hood top and trunk on green with black body so it stands out a bit.

I'm holding my hands up high thanking the creator that the tranny isn't going limp. Ugh I love when my ride makes my head hurt I was having too much fun after the rebuild.

I'll look around for the cable. Say would I have to take the tranny off for that? Do I have to go at it from the inside center console area or underneath the vehicle or both?. I'm being extra gentle with it for now. Rn it only makes noise only slight resistance. Make sure I'm not making any quick shifts.

Thanks for the knowledge glad I got some good news.
 

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"Peva I salute you for coming around here for us older gens"

I appreciate that. I have to be careful when trying to help out with 1st gens as I've never owned or worked on one - only two 2nd gen Concordes that I owned (had to replace the shifter cable on both of them due to the internal corrosion/binding problem - Chrysler eventually figured out how to design the cables not to do that around the 2000-2001 MY IIRC - my 'Cordes were '98 and '99 - but I digress). Before posting to this thread, I verified that the 1st gen uses a cable between shifter and transmission like on 2nd gen (see illustration below from 1st gen pdf).

So - I'd definitely stop short of giving you details of R&R'ing the cable since I have no idea how similar to 2nd gen the important details would be. Glad the Haynes manual covers it. I just hope it's accurate enough to be of help (been badly burned by aftermarket manuals in the past, so I avoid them like the plague - go with factory FSM whenever possible).

Item 2 is the transmission end of the shifter cable (snipped from 93-96 LH parts pdf):
Motor vehicle Font Line Auto part Engineering
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@peva I see alot of people putting gen 2 tranny's in gen 1 vehicles. Could this be an option because I know damn well I'm not finding a gen 1 in a scrap yard and the part was discontinued in 2019 by word of the dealer.

Could I just grease it up or try and repair it? Could it possibly be an adjustment? I would rather put in a component from second gen too if it works better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I found where it got compromised. There is a bolt that is scraping against the rubber coating of the cable. I put grease on it and some 3 layers of plastic wire cover. What a phooy
 

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Ok - so it's fixed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Haha no but at least it will stay protected until I get the new one.

I just called a mopar dealer close to me and they have a distributor that isn't open to the public and specializes in vintage parts. It's the snethkamp dealer since 1923. Said I can score the exact 1996 cable for $100. The vintage says they have 6 in stock so that's good, that shop is in wisconsin.

I think what I will do is move a piece of insulation in that spot where it was rubbing and that should detour any wear and tear on the cable.

For everyone else that needs the shift cable on any 1st gens or any first gen parts call (313) 255-2700. They will secure a part from this distributor. I might ask what other parts they have as well.
 

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Haha no but at least it will stay protected until I get the new one.

I just called a mopar dealer close to me and they have a distributor that isn't open to the public and specializes in vintage parts. It's the snethkamp dealer since 1923. Said I can score the exact 1996 cable for $100. The vintage says they have 6 in stock so that's good, that shop is in wisconsin.

I think what I will do is move a piece of insulation in that spot where it was rubbing and that should detour any wear and tear on the cable.

For everyone else that needs the shift cable on any 1st gens or any first gen parts call (313) 255-2700. They will secure a part from this distributor. I might ask what other parts they have as well.
Wow - SCORE!!

Also, it saved me a bunch of typing. I was going to post a bunch of information this evening to guide you thru possibly making a 2nd-gen cable work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Greasing the half inch diagonal gouge and protecting with the plastic did smooth it when shifting to drive. But shifting to park is still the same. I'll have the part in a week I'm not worried about it at all.

I was on the phone and I was like really? You guys can get one? A forewarning that the part numbers do change between the 1995 and the 1996 and I assume the 97. So finding the exact fit will probably last the longest. I asked.

I'm surprised at the fact no insulation is in that critical spot near the exhaust and next to that bolt. I think I'm going to get some silicone and mound it on that bell housing bolt to make it smooth and also add the insulation. I'll probably harvest the old insulation too to completely cover the cable in the bay.

In other words the shitbox is just breaking in that's all😉
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Another note to add is that in 1996 they added the feature to the transmission where you can also manually shift the transmission. That's neat never tried that before I think I might once I get the new cable.
 

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Info. for the possibility of using a 2nd gen shift cable in a 1996 1st gen car

The following is compiled from several knowns gathered from 2nd gen experience and unknowns and assumptions about possible similarities and differences between important 1st and 2nd gen details. The use of a 2nd gen cable in a 1st gen car has not actually been tried to verify any speculations or assumptions in the provided info.

These are the important details of the cable that must be compatible with the car:

• Overall cable length - the correct length for the routing of the cable between shifter and transmission - this length may or may not be close enough to span the routing distance to work - likely show stopper if not - especially if too short (or perhaps can adjust routing to compensate)

• Cable transmission-end hole-to-transmission shift lever pin - must be the same to work - find 2nd gen transmission shift lever to swap in place of 1st gen lever if different

• Cable sheath end-to-transmission bracket - hopefully the same, may be able to improvise if not - or (easiest and least risk) find 2nd gen bracket to swap in place of 1st gen bracket

• Cable shifter-end hole-to-shifter pin - must be the same to work - find 2nd gen shifter to swap in if different - see NOTE 1, below.

• Cable sheath end-to-shifter bracket - must be same to work. If different, assuming shifter assembly base (contains sheath bracket) will transfer to the 1st gen shifter, should fix that problem - see NOTE 1, below.

• Diameter and details of firewall hole and cable grommet may or may not be different - shouldn't be a big deal if different - if different can likely improvise to seal cable to the firewall, or likely can transfer the grommet from the 1st gen cable for perfect factory fit.

NOTE 1: I think the 1st and 2nd gen shifters are the same basic design, meaning that, while the entire shifter may have some differences, the shifter design is "modular". IOW, the parts like the base are very likely easily swappable between 1st and 2nd gen shifters. This becomes important if, for example, the design details of the sheath end are different, which is easily remedied by swapping the base of a 2nd gen shifter to the first gen shifter since the sheath bracket is an integral part of the base. This is speculation based on the fact that a change in mid-2nd gen production of the cable end design was not compatible between early and late 2nd gen shifters BUT, if, for example, you wanted to use a later 2nd gen cable on an earlier 2nd gen car, this was easily accomplished by swapping the bases of early and late 2nd gen shifter assemblies. The same type of base swap should take care of any differences between 1st and 2nd gen cable sheath end design if they are in fact different.

If the base-swap-between-1st-and-2nd-gen theory is solid, and it likely is, you must get the shifter base that matches whichever of the two 2nd gen cables designs you're going to use - IOW if using early 2nd gen cable, get early 2nd gen shifter to use the whole shifter or its base; or get later 2nd gen cable to use with later 2nd gen shifter or its base.

SO - assuming the lengths of 1st and 2nd gen cables are close enough to work, worst case, you would need 2nd gen transmission shift lever, transmission cable sheath bracket, and shifter (or shifter base) to swap over to the 1st gen car. May not need 2nd gen transmission lever and transmission sheath bracket if same as 1st gen. Transfer 1st gen cable firewall hole grommet to 2nd gen cable if different.


2nd gen shift cable part numbers (one may be more readily available and/or cheaper than the other):

NOTE 2: The changeover between "earlier" and "later" 2nd gen cable design occurred in mid-production of '02 MY.
NOTE 3: Autostick shifters are of the same basic modular design but have some different mechanical and electrical/electronic components for the autostick function than non-autostick shifters.

• Earlier 2nd gen cable (this is a replacement part number that has an improved design compared to what came on the cars from the factory to eliminate moisture/corrosion problem; requires base from earlier 2nd gen shifter): 5114093AA

• Later 2nd gen cable (design is moisture/corrosion resistant; requires base from later 2nd gen shifter): 4578168AB (when searching for the part number, should also try 04578168AB as some data bases only recognize the number with the leading zero and others only recognize it without the leading zero)
 
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