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Discussion Starter #1
I couldn't find a socket/wrench that would fit. God was it the most horrible day of my life working on a vehicle. and i think i pretty much stripped both front bleeder screws. so am i screwed now? new calipers?

oh darn... fill me in guys. and possibly with a proper size that will fit these bleeder screws.
 

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Can you come up with a metric socket that tries to go on the fitting them pound it on to get the bleeder out? then just replace with a new one? vise grips?
 

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And if they are really stuck as part of the problem put some heat on then with a torch and they usually come out a lot easier...

With a little heat I have even go broken off ones out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
awesome, thanks guy. i thought i needed a whole new caliper
 

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carefull on the heat,brake fluid can cause it to explode,I was putting heat to a fitting to get a rubber line off and POP! don't try for cherry red or anything :)
 

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If the flats are rounded completely off, try vice grips, penetrating fluid, pipe wrenches, heat, if you have a welder weld a nut onto the bleeder and turn it out with a wrench, or if all else fails drill them out (can ruin the caliper if you're not careful).
If you get really screwed (no pun intended!), the calipers aren't that expensive after you exchange the core.

You shouldn't have to open the bleeders unless you have opened the system (changed lines or components) somewhere and introduced air or are changing the fluid. Changing pads and such does not nessesitate bleeding the system. Just fyi.

Cheers

BJ:anon:
 

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You have to open the bleeder if you are changing pad and it has anti-lock brakes. Never push the fluid back through the ABS pump. Can be very bad for it. You should clamp off the rubber line and push the old out the bleeder.
 

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Meh, true for abs except it's the pushing of dirty fluid through it that is bad if I remember. I could be wrong though, it could mess up a diaphram or something. I just can't remember and don't feel like looking it up right now as it's bedtime here (getting "that look" from the missus!).

I wouldn't recommend clamping the "rubber" brake line. This used to be common practice in the shop were I used to work, but that was a long time ago. I've seen several chrysler rubber brake lines deteriorate internally after this treatment and fail. The line kind of "delaminates" and then the pieces act like a reed valve holding the caliper slightly on and overheating the pads and rotors.
I know, I know........ I couldn't believe it either until after I changed several lines on a couple cars with the same problem. Weird but true.

Just my .02

cheers

BJ:anon:
 

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Yes what you say is probably true and I could agree with the possible damage to the line.

The fluid deal is that the crud from rubber hoses, oxidated fluid and metal etc. gets pushed back into the pump and can plug orifices, valves etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Great White said:
If the flats are rounded completely off, try vice grips, penetrating fluid, pipe wrenches, heat, if you have a welder weld a nut onto the bleeder and turn it out with a wrench, or if all else fails drill them out (can ruin the caliper if you're not careful).
If you get really screwed (no pun intended!), the calipers aren't that expensive after you exchange the core.

You shouldn't have to open the bleeders unless you have opened the system (changed lines or components) somewhere and introduced air or are changing the fluid. Changing pads and such does not nessesitate bleeding the system. Just fyi.

Cheers

BJ:anon:
yep, and i tried bleeding it for no reason. i was dumb and i the screws are done for. my question is how to i take the screw out and prevent the fluid from pissing out. im guessing by vise gripping the brake line.
 

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If you take them out it only flows out by gravity so is not that much. If you have the new bleeders, just screw out the old and put in the new. You lose a little fluid but not much. Just put some paper down and then clean up when your done.
Should not have to worry about air getting in.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
sounds good. its a screw in and screw out kinda thing ;)

COOL
 
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