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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have the tools necessary to remove and replace the crankshaft sprocket on the 2.7l
MLR5048-1 - Puller (Body)
MLR5048-6 - Puller (Cup)
MLR8539 - Puller Adapter
MLR6780-1 - Crankshaft Seal & Sprocket Installer
MLR8179 - Crankshaft Damper Installer Screw
or equivalent from other manufactures?
 

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As is often the case, with a little improvisation, the special tools are not needed.

There's enough room around the sprocket that a common medium or small 2- or 3-jaw puller will grip the sprocket from behind and pull it off. Be sure to protect the snout of the crankshaft and its internal threads by putting a hard washer between the end of the crankshaft and the puller bolt tip, or, even better, use the type of puller with a pusher shaft that inserts into the crankshaft's hole. (Often the pusher bolts of different types of pullers are interchageable - i.e., have the same thread - 5/8" fine-thread IIRC - allowing you to swap out the typical pusher bolt with the type with the insertable shaft.)

(Before I did mine, I didn't realize that there was enough room behind the sprocket for common puller jaws, and I bought a common old-school pitman-arm puller just the right size to fit around the sprocket.

Without seeing how much room there was around and behind the sprocket, thinking that room was scarce, I ground the grip end if the pitman-arm puller to make it thinner. Once I got into the engine, it was clear that a simple jaw-type puller would work fine, so all that prep and butchering up a perfectly good pitman-arm puller was unnecessary.)

For installing, you can improvise with a 3/4"-drive socket sized just big enough to fit over the OD of the crankshaft to push against the sprocket. Put a thick washer with the hole sized for an M14 bolt against the drive hole side of the socket. Find a fine-thread M14x1.5 thread bolt to engage the internal threads of the crankshaft. The bolt needs to be longer than the factory damper pulley bolt to make sure to give enough thread engagement to develop the needed pull force without stripping out the crankshaft threads. If you can't find a suitable bolt, you can whack the socket with a 4-pound hammer to push the sprocket on, but a bolt gives you more control to gradually and gently push the sprocket home with less risk of damaging something.

IMPORTANT: Be sure the sprocket is pushed on until it hits the crankshaft's diameter step by following this measurement check in the FSM: "Verify that crankshaft sprocket is installed to proper depth by measuring from sprocket outer face to end of crankshaft (Fig. 125). Measurement should read: 39.05 ±0.50 mm (1.5374 ±0.020 in.)."
(see figure below)

Fortunately, I did that check when I did mine. I thought the sprocket was fully seated, but it wasn't - it had just hit a snag making it feel like it was up against the diameter step, but it wasn't. The measurement coming up short revealed that it was not fully on. I got it past the snag by pulling it off again, and pushing it back on again. If I had not made the check measurement, not having the sprocket fully seated could have resulted in disaster.

41051
 

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Discussion Starter #3
As is often the case, with a little improvisation, the special tools are not needed.

There's enough room around the sprocket that a common medium or small 2- or 3-jaw puller will grip the sprocket from behind and pull it off. Be sure to protect the snout of the crankshaft and its internal threads by putting a hard washer between the end of the crankshaft and the puller bolt tip, or, even better, use the type of puller with a pusher shaft that inserts into the crankshaft's hole. (Often the pusher bolts of different types of pullers are interchageable - i.e., have the same thread - 5/8" fine-thread IIRC - allowing you to swap out the typical pusher bolt with the type with the insertable shaft.)

(Before I did mine, I didn't realize that there was enough room behind the sprocket for common puller jaws, and I bought a common old-school pitman-arm puller just the right size to fit around the sprocket.

Without seeing how much room there was around and behind the sprocket, thinking that room was scarce, I ground the grip end if the pitman-arm puller to make it thinner. Once I got into the engine, it was clear that a simple jaw-type puller would work fine, so all that prep and butchering up a perfectly good pitman-arm puller was unnecessary.)

For installing, you can improvise with a 3/4"-drive socket sized just big enough to fit over the OD of the crankshaft to push against the sprocket. Put a thick washer with the hole sized for an M14 bolt against the drive hole side of the socket. Find a fine-thread M14x1.5 thread bolt to engage the internal threads of the crankshaft. The bolt needs to be longer than the factory damper pulley bolt to make sure to give enough thread engagement to develop the needed pull force without stripping out the crankshaft threads. If you can't find a suitable bolt, you can whack the socket with a 4-pound hammer to push the sprocket on, but a bolt gives you more control to gradually and gently push the sprocket home with less risk of damaging something.

IMPORTANT: Be sure the sprocket is pushed on until it hits the crankshaft's diameter step by following this measurement check in the FSM: "Verify that crankshaft sprocket is installed to proper depth by measuring from sprocket outer face to end of crankshaft (Fig. 125). Measurement should read: 39.05 ±0.50 mm (1.5374 ±0.020 in.)."
(see figure below)

Fortunately, I did that check when I did mine. I thought the sprocket was fully seated, but it wasn't - it had just hit a snag making it feel like it was up against the diameter step, but it wasn't. The measurement coming up short revealed that it was not fully on. I got it past the snag by pulling it off again, and pushing it back on again. If I had not made the check measurement, not having the sprocket fully seated could have resulted in disaster.

View attachment 41051

Thanks, I'll try some other pullers then. The 3 jaw pullers I've tried won't fit behind the sprocket. I can get 2 arms to fit in recesses in the oil pump but cant get a straight pull. I'll let you know how it goes. I saw a YouTube video to heat the sprocker on a stove then just slide it on. Don't think ill try that though.
 

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Can you do some grinding on the puller jaws to provide just enough clearance to get them behind the slrocket?

If not, you could do what I did with a pitman arm puller. On re-reading my original post about that (post no. 6: Timing Chain Help), I see that I didn't have to grind the jaws at all - I only had to thin down the threaded part of the puller because it was slightly too short for the length of the crankshaft dticking out beyond the sprocket. I don't know where that photo is now - I'll look for it.

(I see from that post that I used a schedule 80 pipe nipple and large washers - not a large socket. Memory sometimes ain't too reliable.) :)

If I was able to make the pitman arm puller work, I have to believe a regular two-jaw puller would have to fit - possible with no grinding. If the thickness of the working ends of the jaws are hitting the oil pump, thin them down. That would weaken the jaw tips, but probably not enough to make them too weak for this job. Perhaps the same thing would work with the 3-jaw puller, and the stress would be shared by 3 jaws instead of 2.

You'll get it figured out!
 
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