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Speed is Power
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If I'm correct, its suppose to be a beer color clear.

I just took this picture, didnt really want to put the liquid in an actual drinking glass, so I put it in a collectors glass.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Okay, thanks. I was a bit worried. My power steering fluid was black, and that wasn't good. My car needs brake work anyway. Hopefully by next month, I'll take it in and get the brakes done, outer tie rods and alignment.
 

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Brake fluid is straw colored.
It turns black as the butyl rubber in the seals breaks down and it absorbs water over time. No big, just flush it and you're good to go.
Unless you are noticing other probs of course.
Power steering fluid shouldn't be black either. probably time for a flush as well.


Hmmm........ I think I like the beer colored comment better than straw now that I think of it.

MMmmmmmmm...........beer.

Cheers

BJ
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I changed the power steering fluid yesterday. Its now a very light yellowish color, instead of the black goop that was originally in it.

As for the brake fluid, I'll see if the shop says it's okay. It's not terribly expensive.
 

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Warlord187 said:
Brake fluid should be changed every two years regardless of mileage. Remember, brake fluid absorbs water. Water doesn't compress. The older the brake fluid, the more water it has, the harder it is to compress, and the lower the boiling point temperature.
ummm.......
you're right about the effect of water on the boiling point, but brake fluid is used because it is imcompressable, even more so than water.
Brake fluid is anhydrous (absorbs water, it will even pull it out of the air) and the problem with this is that the water allows the metal parts to rust in the brake system and when it boils because of high braking temperature it allows the brakes to go spongy as the water in vapour form is very compressable.
We're basically talking about the same thing, although I'm not sure where you are going with the water being hard to compress. In a closed brake system, you want a fluid that is hard to compress as it will then transfere all of the braking force applied to the pedal through the master cylinder to the calipers/shoes.

Cheers

BJ
 

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Great White said:
ummm.......
you're right about the effect of water on the boiling point, but brake fluid is used because it is imcompressable, even more so than water.
Brake fluid is anhydrous (absorbs water, it will even pull it out of the air) and the problem with this is that the water allows the metal parts to rust in the brake system and when it boils because of high braking temperature it allows the brakes to go spongy as the water in vapour form is very compressable.
We're basically talking about the same thing, although I'm not sure where you are going with the water being hard to compress. In a closed brake system, you want a fluid that is hard to compress as it will then transfere all of the braking force applied to the pedal through the master cylinder to the calipers/shoes.

Cheers

BJ
Yeah, who the hell knows what I was thinking. It's been a strange last couple of days.

Oh wait. I know what I was thinking. I was recently talking about water getting into the engine cylinders. If that were to happen, the rods would crack because water doesn't compress.

DOH!
 

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Big proble is water being absorbed in the brake fluid causing the system to start rusting resulting iin crud being in the pistons cuaing the piston bores to score and rubber seals to become ruined causing system to leak. Also, the boiling point will be cut in half within a couple of years, resulting in vaporized brake fluid.
 
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