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My water pump and timing chain are fine right now. I never had a problem with either of them.
I will be putting the car on the back burner as far as interior work, paint, etc. As of right now, I am looking at prices of old motor-homes.
yeah, if you watch your coolant level like a hawk you should be fine. You can check the chain stretch by pulling off the intake plenum and passenger side cam cover so you can see how much extension there is on the tensioner. I believe you could also install a chain block at that time which would be a good, cheap, insurance policy that when/if your tensioner ever did stop working there'd be MUCH less chance of your engine jumping time (a very BAD thing).

I've got a 1971 (Dodge) sightseer I'm going to be selling in Northern California (Chico area). I'm gonna want a pretty penny for it tho, considering there's tons of fire victims here looking for something to dry-camp on their burned out properties and this particular RV runs great and is rare as hen's teeth. I don't think a person could lose money on this thing tho considering the running gear is in excellent shape, the shell's decent, and its collectability. Its biggest issues right now I'd say are: something to do with the blackwater tank is leaking (probably the fitting/pipe going from the dump to it), the 12V fuse panel needs replacing, it needs a roof A/C unit (or my preference: a swamp cooler). IIRC it's a dually. I used it to tow an 8500 lb boat and trailer from Stockton (basically sea level) to Magalia (approximately 3000' elevation) a few years ago (mostly at freeway speed) and it did it without so much as a hiccup (well, except, it shut its headlights off in the middle of the night right on the steepest/narrowest part of the trip -- due to the rusty fuse panel or switch most likely; but I was following a friend so I could see from her headlights until I could get it pulled over).

HMU if that's something you might be interested in.

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BxidmAmnqG8zUUthZ0s3THRLcmc?usp=sharing

(BTW I've upgraded the captain's chairs to nice comfy gray ones out of a dodge minivan, cuz the originals were so trashed; yeah, they're not technically "period correct," but I was going more for comfort/durability/practicality over the long haul and on long trips)
 

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Actually, I never had a problem passing people on the highway or freeway in this car. I rarely go into the opposite lane to pass unless it is a straightway & legal to do so...
When I swapped the 2.7 from my ‘99 Concorde to my ‘98 Concorde with 3.2, I swapped only the engine, so the 2.7 is coupled to the low ratio transfer chain sprockets. Even now it’s adequate for me on 70 mph I-81 with hills. Full disclosure: I’m 68 y.o., and recently got excited on making a passive turn signal amplifier for my ‘85 F150 by gluing a soft cat food can onto the flasher so I don’t leave the turn signal on when it fails to self cancel. So - yeah - there’s that. :auto_07:
 

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Discussion Starter #24
kevinfish,

Very nice photos of your motor-home. I do have a (kind of lowish) price range (savings goal) & that motor-home would be out of it. I am on a fixed income. I am looking for a motor-home that I will be doing some work on, like, putting faux wood flooring (vinyl), redoing closet space with drawers (hidden behind regular closet doors so they don't move while driving) & perhaps a hidden spot for my guitar and uke, etc. So, for me anyway, it doesn't make sense to spend a 'pretty penny' on a motor-home if I am just going to tear it up inside & redo it.
I lived in a fifth wheel for 5 years. Loved it but couldn't be moved because I didn't have a truck. First, had a van (a loaner with an attitude), then the Intrepid.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
When I swapped the 2.7 from my ‘99 Concorde to my ‘98 Concorde with 3.2, I swapped only the engine, so the 2.7 is coupled to the low ratio transfer chain sprockets. Even now it’s adequate for me on 70 mph I-81 with hills. Full disclosure: I’m 68 y.o., and recently got excited on making a passive turn signal amplifier for my ‘85 F150 by gluing a soft cat food can onto the flasher so I don’t leave the turn signal on when it fails to self cancel. So - yeah - there’s that. :auto_07:
It is good to get excited when you get a vague idea & then make it work. I have done that in the past. Improved on an idea. I get excited when I walk into my garage. It is my wood shop.
I'm a 48 year old woman learning to whittle.
 

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I don't think you can upgrade the pump w/o also upgrading the chain and sprockets as they are quite different beasts (and I'm pretty sure about this cuz I quite literally am in the middle of one right now).
As of the last one I did, about 3 years ago, you could buy the updated pump to fit the original chain and sprockets. Whether or not its still available from Dodge, I havent checked. However if you call and order one for an older style chain, you will get the updated beefier pump, to fit the older style chain, as they discontinued the original pumps that had the design issues.

The new style pump is visibly beefier, and has a larger bearing and a thinner gasket.

You can do either option, as in upgrade the chain and pump, or just the pump; if the original chain is good you can re-use, as that was not the problem, the water pump was.
 

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As of the last one I did, about 3 years ago, you could buy the updated pump to fit the original chain and sprockets. Whether or not its still available from Dodge, I havent checked. However if you call and order one for an older style chain, you will get the updated beefier pump, to fit the older style chain, as they discontinued the original pumps that had the design issues.

The new style pump is visibly beefier, and has a larger bearing and a thinner gasket.

You can do either option, as in upgrade the chain and pump, or just the pump; if the original chain is good you can re-use, as that was not the problem, the water pump was.
That's good to know, but I still kind of like the idea of the lighter chain and better clearance of the later style kit since I plan on putting 100k miles on it hopefully before another major teardown the extra couple hundred bucks should be amortized out into almost nothing by that time. My only concern is getting them cuz they're disappearing fast. Too bad no one is knocking them off with a decent quality clone (or any clone at all for that matter).
 

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Oh okay, I will have my mechanic look at the timing chain & water pump next time I take the car in. I am not faint of heart, not afraid of hard work, just don't have the experience level you are talking about. Nor the tools. Sad but true.
Maybe I should take my step dad's advice and take mechanic classes...
there really aren't that many tools needed, although it is a fairly involved process. I'm sure you could do it if you did your research online (several decent videos on youtube for example) and took your time. A couple of the parts require a bit of stamina and/or strength (like I always wind the engine around by hand until the timing marks come up again to make SURE I'm still dead-nuts on with it -- which seems like it takes forever) so it might be good if you had a strong helper if you aren't that buff.

Also while you're in there you'll probably also want to do the thermostat and lower radiator hose (since they're so hard to get to otherwise). Those can be a challenge especially if you don't have a rack so you can go at it thru the wheel well looking at the bolts from eye level (and you'll need a LONG socket extension -- or a bunch strung together). Getting your hand in there can be really fun (where you might have an actual advantage if you have dantier female hands).

If you can do it in a place that's fairly open and away from neighbors (or wait till its windy) I like to freeze the crank with liquid propane while I'm heating my crank sprocket (and then later my balancer) in the oven so they slide on like butter in spite of the interference fit. I did do one at a friends heating the balancer up on the wood stove and installing it first thing on a frozen winter morning and that worked well also. You can get the crank sprocket really hot (like 500 F in an oven) and it will probably go on pretty easy even in warm weather. You should probably limit the balancer to about 400 F since it has rubber inside and you don't want to burn/ruin it. Of course once you have the balancer on sufficiently to start the threads of the center bolt you could just crank it down by jamming the engine with a couple feet of clothesline in one of the cyls thru the spark plug hole, but then you might need a LONG ratchet and some elbow grease especially if you weren't really quick about it.
 

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Sounds like a way to bend valves if the cylinder you pick isn't on the compression stroke.
well that would be easy enough to arrange if you've got the cam covers off. I've always tried to heat and cool various things off enough that I don't really need to put much torque on the crank with the wrench
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Going to have my mechanic look at it when it is closer to Thanksgiving. If it needs to be changed, then I will tell him I want the Mopar version.
Most of my tools have to do with wood working, as in saws, hammers, levels, etc. Have a few sockets but they aren't big ones.
 
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