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Discussion Starter #1
Checked with dealership where I service, and they said they put Mopar 5W20 all year round in all dodge/chryslers. Is this good? Need recommendations, as I now need to switch the maintenance of my Trep to a private mechanic - Trep is getting old, and cant afford the prices of these dealerships.
 

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My knowledge says that only 5/30 (maybe 10/30 in summer) is recommended for the 2.7. I wouldn't put 5/20 in there, there is no reason for it. I would use Mobil 1 5/30 synthetic and run it for 5000 miles or so.
 

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A full synthetic oil........10W30 in the summer, 5W30 in the winter in a 2.7L.
 

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5W-20 is for the newer 2.7L's found in the 2005 Sebrings, among others. Its not for the older models, certainly not a 1998. My manual states 5W-30, and 10W-30 for when its not going to get below zero. I use 5W-30 year round. Whatever dealership you went to, you might want to let them know they are giving incorrect info about your car.
 

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5w-20 No way.
There were 'issues' with the connecting rod bearings for the first couple of years.
For longevity a 10w-40 for the summer and a 5w-30 for winter would be fine.
But any synthetic 0w-30, 5w-30, 10w-30 would be fine year round.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
THANKS guys, that was what I knew of. A confirmation from the wealth of knowledge in the forum does not hurt.
 

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I've always used 10W-30 all year round in my 4 and 6 cylinder cars. Always got well over 100k with no smoke or anything. I have 101k on my 2.7 ....I use 10w-30 Mobil 1 . When they just recently did the timing chain, they found no evidence of any sludge. Engine still runs strong, doesn't burn no oil.....and I drives it harddd.
 

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10W-30 is the accepted norm (what I would recommed ) for all new motors. It will protect good all the way down to around -15 degrees. If you expect the car to be in any colder temps then switch to a 5W-30, or a 5W-40. On the other hand if you are planning of driving in really hot temps the put 15W-30 in your car.

Now as for synthetic, it is a good idea to use it, cars love it and it will improve you gas mileage and help your engine last longer, but a couple words of caution - it is a shock to the engine if you go straight from mineral oil to full synthetic all at once. So just use blend oil for about 2 oil changes while you transition the car from mineral oil to synthetic oil. Also DO NOT use full synthetic on a brand new engine, or a recently rebuilt engine (that is a whole nother topic). And lastly If you are already losing oil someplace - don't use synthetic, not for any other reason that it is a waste of money....

A very quick description of the what the Oil codes mean, for those that are curious: Ther first digit(s) are the viscosity at cold operating temperatures. (viscosity = resistance to flow; lower numbers mean it flows easier.) The 'W' simply means it is suitable for winter use, a lot of people think it meants 'weight', it doesn't. and the last digits mean the viscosity rating at high (normal) operating temperatures.


Hope it helps...
 

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I would use 5w-40 in the summer, and 15w-30 in the winter.
The second number is way more important, I was lucky and ran 5w-50 in the summer, and found out the way to compare oils is based on actual kinematic viscosity numbers, not what the bottle says, just before the cold fall, winter came.


http://www.dodgeintrepid.net/forums/showthread.php?t=70556

That 'silent' timing chain can be murder on oil, the secondary chains are roller though.
 

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they said they put Mopar 5W20
They are crazy... they must of been smoking something during their lunch time. 5W-20 is for the 2.7's in the magnums, chargers and 300's.
Use only 5w-30 or 10-30W oil for yor trep. Oh and they said "MOPAR" just to try to make you go waste your money on them.
 

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Idaho-Intrepid said:
Now as for synthetic, it is a good idea to use it, cars love it and it will improve you gas mileage and help your engine last longer, but a couple words of caution - it is a shock to the engine if you go straight from mineral oil to full synthetic all at once. So just use blend oil for about 2 oil changes while you transition the car from mineral oil to synthetic oil. Also DO NOT use full synthetic on a brand new engine, or a recently rebuilt engine (that is a whole nother topic).
Just ran a quick search and didn't turn up anything, so I'll ask: why is it harmfull to use synthetics in rebuild/new engines? I have a theory, but don't plan on looking like an idiot... I do have a freshly assembled 1st gen 3.5 that's about to go in my trep (got it done just in time for my crank shaft to shear off) and a second gen for a friend. How many oil changes should we stick with dino's?
 

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perpetualpeachyos said:
Just ran a quick search and didn't turn up anything, so I'll ask: why is it harmfull to use synthetics in rebuild/new engines? I have a theory, but don't plan on looking like an idiot... I do have a freshly assembled 1st gen 3.5 that's about to go in my trep (got it done just in time for my crank shaft to shear off) and a second gen for a friend. How many oil changes should we stick with dino's?

Stick with Dino Juice for about the first oil change, basically the break in period. But do not be to nice to your engine during this time, or on the other extreme do not be too hard on it.

Using Fully synthetic on a new engine, and this is going to sound like an oxy-moron type thing, does not allow the same friction pattern as mineral oil. Basically it is too perfect of an oil. So when it comes down to it, all the different parts are not allowed to wear against each other and seat themselves. Chevy Ran into a big problem with this in the late 90's. The cars would run fine up until the owner put a stress on the engine, and ithe engine would warm up quicker then was designed for the it.... Well to put it shortly, the engines would have lots of mechanical problems after that.
Quazy Scientic reasoning ---> Many different metal in the car. All of which have different heat characteristic, therefor all heat up and expand at different rates, and as metal heats, it also gains different strngth characteristics (Translation = Heat Treating/Temperering.... I could really go into detail about this, but I do not want to bore you more than I already am.) So if parts are not allowed wear against each other when the metal is softer, then when the metal hardens it will not give/wear as easily, and then, boom.

So basically, what I could have said, and made it much much shorter. Synthetic is too slippery and soes not allow your parts to seat against each other.

Sorry about that, I can get a little long winded, I am used to teaching the long versions of this.
 

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No longer true (if it ever was). The big 3 plus many EU car makers use synthetic for the factory fill in certain models. These same models often require oil specs that can only be met with continued use of synthetic. The only reason that synthetic isn't used in all new cars is because it simply isn't required. But using synthetic will not void the warranty or negatively impact the break in.

Idaho-Intrepid said:
Stick with Dino Juice for about the first oil change, basically the break in period. But do not be to nice to your engine during this time, or on the other extreme do not be too hard on it.

Using Fully synthetic on a new engine, and this is going to sound like an oxy-moron type thing, does not allow the same friction pattern as mineral oil. Basically it is too perfect of an oil. So when it comes down to it, all the different parts are not allowed to wear against each other and seat themselves. Chevy Ran into a big problem with this in the late 90's. The cars would run fine up until the owner put a stress on the engine, and ithe engine would warm up quicker then was designed for the it.... Well to put it shortly, the engines would have lots of mechanical problems after that.
Quazy Scientic reasoning ---> Many different metal in the car. All of which have different heat characteristic, therefor all heat up and expand at different rates, and as metal heats, it also gains different strngth characteristics (Translation = Heat Treating/Temperering.... I could really go into detail about this, but I do not want to bore you more than I already am.) So if parts are not allowed wear against each other when the metal is softer, then when the metal hardens it will not give/wear as easily, and then, boom.

So basically, what I could have said, and made it much much shorter. Synthetic is too slippery and soes not allow your parts to seat against each other.

Sorry about that, I can get a little long winded, I am used to teaching the long versions of this.
 

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va3ux said:
No longer true (if it ever was). The big 3 plus many EU car makers use synthetic for the factory fill in certain models. These same models often require oil specs that can only be met with continued use of synthetic. The only reason that synthetic isn't used in all new cars is because it simply isn't required. But using synthetic will not void the warranty or negatively impact the break in.

Car manufacturer mostly start a car with synthetic as a marketing ploy. Notice that synthetic is always used in upper class automobiles.. But when you really want to look at it, look to the east, all of the Japanese maunfacuters use regular dino Oil, and I am sure that no one will argue with the fact that they have THEE best reliability rating out of all cars.

But true, if it will not due any harm to the engine if you start with synthetic, but if you start with synthetic, once you are over a couple of thousand miles, DO NOT EVER put natural Oil back into a car. That would be catastrophic to the engine.
 

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I got aboud 20 cans of old RED INDIAN motor oil in my garage. Think it's from the 30's

Wonder what would happen to a 2.7 if I used it. LOL
 

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Idaho-Intrepid said:
10W-30 is the accepted norm (what I would recommed ) for all new motors. It will protect good all the way down to around -15 degrees. If you expect the car to be in any colder temps then switch to a 5W-30, or a 5W-40. On the other hand if you are planning of driving in really hot temps the put 15W-30 in your car.

Now as for synthetic, it is a good idea to use it, cars love it and it will improve you gas mileage and help your engine last longer, but a couple words of caution - it is a shock to the engine if you go straight from mineral oil to full synthetic all at once. So just use blend oil for about 2 oil changes while you transition the car from mineral oil to synthetic oil. Also DO NOT use full synthetic on a brand new engine, or a recently rebuilt engine (that is a whole nother topic). And lastly If you are already losing oil someplace - don't use synthetic, not for any other reason that it is a waste of money....

QUOTE]
Uhhh Idaho, I would peel some potatos before you start throwing oil advice around.
Synthetic is not a marketing ploy.
There is Absolutely NO truth to the statement about synthetic being a shock to the car. Hilarious,
5/30 is the recommended oil, 10/30 in the summer
you can use synthetic from the get go in a brand new engine. Old wives tale.

If you dispute this show proof, and also post this on bobistheoilguy.com and get laughed at and embarassed all at the same time. I don't think you have much real knowledge of tribology and metallurgy and inorganic and organic compounds...
And you need badly how to spell and use grammar check...
 

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Ok so you want to play semantics with me fine. Look up Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University on the Web. IT is the Premier Aerospace Engineering and Maintenance school in the world. That is were I teach at, I teach at the maintenance department, and graduted their aerospace engineering Dept minoring in propulsion, safety, maintenance, and aeronautics.

Here are some direct exerpts from my engine design book for you. Publish date April 2005.

Some of the requirements that determine Oil Type usage are:
The operating load of the bearings and gears, the rotational speed which determine the operating speed of the bearings, the operating temeratures, "different materials used and different rates of expansion of various materials"....

Did you know that there are actually six types of oils for you engine.... Mineral oils, Metallic-ash detergent oil, Ashless-Dispersent Oil, Multi-viscosity Oils, Synthetic Oil, and Semi-Synthetic Oil.

Now, Mineral Oils. A short lesson for you. There are two type of oils in this category. Asphaltic- of naphthetic-base crude oil that come from california and the the gulf of mexico, then there is the Paraffinic-base crude oil that comes from around pennsylvannia. "Straight mineral oil, Meeting MIL-L-6082, or SAE J 1966 specifications is being phased out as theprincipal lubricating oil for reciprocating engines, but most engine [not automotive, but engine] manufacturers recommend its use in new and freshly overhauled engines for about the first 10-50 hours, or until oil consumption stabilizes."

Synthetic oil: Synthetic oil is made by synthesizing or changing the molecular structure of certain animal, vegatable, or mineral bases to form a new type of oil base. Synthetic oils have superior characteristics for high temperatures and are used most exclusively for Aircraft Turbine engines. They have two charactersistics that make them desirable for use in reciprcating engines: They have a superior resistance to oxidation, which allows a longer period between changes, and they have a low internal friction. One Problem with synthetic oil is their tendency toward sludge buildup, especially in engines that are not used frequently.
Now here is the the kicker " Synthetic Oils are not universally apporved for use in reciprocating engines, but this is subject to change as further study and developments are made."

Here is the part for you "Shock argument". "Mineral Oils, which are obtained by the distillation of crude petroleum, are the most widely used used lubricants for engines because they have much greater chemical stability than other types of oils."


Personally I do not care much about my spelling and grammer mistakes, I am not an English Major... But before you citicize me, check you own stuff, and make sure it is perfect...... "And you need badly how to spell and use grammar check..."
 

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Idaho-Intrepid said:
Ok so you want to play semantics with me fine. Look up Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University on the Web. IT is the Premier Aerospace Engineering and Maintenance school in the world. That is were I teach at, I teach at the maintenance department, and graduted their aerospace engineering Dept minoring in propulsion, safety, maintenance, and aeronautics.

Here are some direct exerpts from my engine design book for you. Publish date April 2005.

Some of the requirements that determine Oil Type usage are:
The operating load of the bearings and gears, the rotational speed which determine the operating speed of the bearings, the operating temeratures, "different materials used and different rates of expansion of various materials"....

Did you know that there are actually six types of oils for you engine.... Mineral oils, Metallic-ash detergent oil, Ashless-Dispersent Oil, Multi-viscosity Oils, Synthetic Oil, and Semi-Synthetic Oil.

Now, Mineral Oils. A short lesson for you. There are two type of oils in this category. Asphaltic- of naphthetic-base crude oil that come from california and the the gulf of mexico, then there is the Paraffinic-base crude oil that comes from around pennsylvannia. "Straight mineral oil, Meeting MIL-L-6082, or SAE J 1966 specifications is being phased out as theprincipal lubricating oil for reciprocating engines, but most engine [not automotive, but engine] manufacturers recommend its use in new and freshly overhauled engines for about the first 10-50 hours, or until oil consumption stabilizes."

Synthetic oil: Synthetic oil is made by synthesizing or changing the molecular structure of certain animal, vegatable, or mineral bases to form a new type of oil base. Synthetic oils have superior characteristics for high temperatures and are used most exclusively for Aircraft Turbine engines. They have two charactersistics that make them desirable for use in reciprcating engines: They have a superior resistance to oxidation, which allows a longer period between changes, and they have a low internal friction. One Problem with synthetic oil is their tendency toward sludge buildup, especially in engines that are not used frequently.
Now here is the the kicker " Synthetic Oils are not universally apporved for use in reciprocating engines, but this is subject to change as further study and developments are made."

Here is the part for you "Shock argument". "Mineral Oils, which are obtained by the distillation of crude petroleum, are the most widely used used lubricants for engines because they have much greater chemical stability than other types of oils."


Personally I do not care much about my spelling and grammer mistakes, I am not an English Major... But before you citicize me, check you own stuff, and make sure it is perfect...... "And you need badly how to spell and use grammar check..."
To say hi to a Person attending there from Novi Mi. If you can answer that your from Daytona.
You haven't said a thing above that couldn't be found in outdated textbooks. You are either of foreign descent or just not real educated. And to actually say that synthetic oils cause sludge. You have no real knowledge of triboloby, metallurgy or engineering. I see some things that were copied from excerpts from bobistheoilguy.com. I have too read that, the rest of your diatribe about never using synthetic in new or existing engines without first using semi syn is pure hogwash... Where in the world did you come up with that. By the way I am a metallurgist (metallurgical engineer) and Welding engineer and teach at Wayne State in Detroit. And I can spell.
you have no real knowledge to advise people in this forum to use particular oils or to advise a scheme of oil usage. NONE. It's quite obvious.

"It's were (should be where) I teach at." Among 14 other grammar and misspellings...
Hogwash, you imposter. No accredited University professor or even a TA is that uneducated in the English language. Your grammar and diction and spelling is 5th or 6th grade at best in all factual honesty. If you are indeed the "professor" and "author" of an engineering book then I fear for the population of students at ER. By the way the Airforce is the Premier school not ER. ER gets the students that couldn't get into the Airforce.
Oh and your profile says you are like 24 and a student. Burn.
Please dont' get into oil discussions you are not educated to participate in as an expert. You sir or (boy) are not... And you are not in any way shape or form Teaching at E/R. Maybe a 24 year old gofer for a TA or a Professor, but you sir are not a "teacher" and "teaching a class"... Further Burn....+3
 
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