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Uhm In the cylinder head..... they are the smaller ones. The intake springs have an orange mark on them and the exhaust will have either a green or a yellow mark....

why, what are you up to?
 

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Nice is not all its cracked up to be!

Funny yes, but not trying to be mean, but no one likes to have no replies!
 

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On the exhaust valve valve stem. it's all under the valve cover.

What are you going to try? Or perhaps you were told yours are gone?

More info please, this is a very curious question.

Cheers

BJ
 

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He posted this in another thread too..he's worried about a shake in the engine at a certain speed (around 70 if I'm not mistaken), and there was a TSB about the exhaust valve springs being weak and allowing the valves to float.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
TERMINATOR101CA said:
He posted this in another thread too..he's worried about a shake in the engine at a certain speed (around 70 if I'm not mistaken), and there was a TSB about the exhaust valve springs being weak and allowing the valves to float.
thats right. i have a stumble at 47mph. i saw this TSB at the chysler dealership but they dont wanna work on my car as i had the lifter TSB done at another chrysler dealership. they told me to go back to where i got the lifter adusters done. service manager is an asshole at Brampton Chrysler.

question: i didnt get any codes on the stumble as it menstions in the TSB. should i wait for the codes to come up?
 

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No, don't wait. But if I understand you right, I do not think it is your springs, there would be an annoying ticking sound along with a rattling sound.... Plus if it was an exhaust spring, it would not be dependent on speed, but rather engine RPMs..... and you would have a very noticable loss of power.

Before you go tearing into your head, look for something else...... But an easy way to check is do a compression check, and inspect your spark plugs. You should have at least 100 PSI in there at compression. If your valves are floating, then at higher RPM you will not get any real compression....Then tell us what you find.

Give us a better description of what is wrong....
 

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Valve float is a condition at high rpm. Not likely to be happening at 47 mph, unless you're holding it in a lower gear. Or it could be a broken valve spring, which would reduce the total "clamping" force of the spring itself allowing it to float at a lower rpm.

Compression is not a very likely culprit either as compression problems are evident over the entire rpm range. Poor compression is a result of worn bores and rings, burnt or bent valves, holed pistons, etc.

I would look elsewhere for the stumble as idaho suggests, however:

I would look more to the engine management system (ie: fuel delivery, electronics, ignition, etc) for a stumble at a specific rpm/mph problem. When the engine stumbles at 47 mph, note the engine rpm. Then duplicate the rpm at different speeds by holding hte car in lower gears, the stumble should occur at those speeds as well.

No codes you say? None at all?

Cheers

BJ
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great White said:
Valve float is a condition at high rpm. Not likely to be happening at 47 mph, unless you're holding it in a lower gear. Or it could be a broken valve spring, which would reduce the total "clamping" force of the spring itself allowing it to float at a lower rpm.

Compression is not a very likely culprit either as compression problems are evident over the entire rpm range. Poor compression is a result of worn bores and rings, burnt or bent valves, holed pistons, etc.

I would look elsewhere for the stumble as idaho suggests, however:

I would look more to the engine management system (ie: fuel delivery, electronics, ignition, etc) for a stumble at a specific rpm/mph problem. When the engine stumbles at 47 mph, note the engine rpm. Then duplicate the rpm at different speeds by holding hte car in lower gears, the stumble should occur at those speeds as well.

No codes you say? None at all?

Cheers

BJ
No codes yet. but i will do what u suggested, note the RPM and duplicate it at low gear. However when i read the TSB at chrysler it was exactly what i was encountering. says when engine is in gear and appreaches 47mph theres a stumble in the engine which may cause a one or more codes to show. one of the code will be P0300 i dont remember the other one.
 

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Great White said:
Valve float is a condition at high rpm. Not likely to be happening at 47 mph, unless you're holding it in a lower gear. Or it could be a broken valve spring, which would reduce the total "clamping" force of the spring itself allowing it to float at a lower rpm.

Compression is not a very likely culprit either as compression problems are evident over the entire rpm range. Poor compression is a result of worn bores and rings, burnt or bent valves, holed pistons, etc.

I would look elsewhere for the stumble as idaho suggests, however:

I would look more to the engine management system (ie: fuel delivery, electronics, ignition, etc) for a stumble at a specific rpm/mph problem. When the engine stumbles at 47 mph, note the engine rpm. Then duplicate the rpm at different speeds by holding hte car in lower gears, the stumble should occur at those speeds as well.

No codes you say? None at all?

Cheers

BJ
True all those problems cause low compression. But you have to remember that when an exhaust valve is floating, it is never completely closing, so the cylinder is never allowed to pressurize. All the fuel and air that goes in, imediately goes right back out. SO that said, you may not see a low compression at low RPM, but at a certain point on the RPM scale you will lose practically all compression in a cylinder that has a weak valve spring.

Other symptoms you might notice with a floating valve, a noticable loss of power at a certain RPM, relatively constant backfiring, and sudden surges in RPMs.
 

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A valve float condition is when the valve closes and hammers off the valve seat. The spring has insufficeint clamping force to keep the valve from bouncing back up when it hits the seat. A broken spring will cause this condition as will as a sunken valve seat or sacked springs after many many miles.
In essence, you are correct. But if valve float is causing the problem, there is a mechanical failure of some sort. Not indicative by a problem that occurs at a certain road speed.
If it actually is true valve float, it will occur with rpm, regardless of road speed.

If the tsb describes your condition exactly, then take it to the dealer, see if they will fix it. A different dealer from the one that originally performed the repair shouldn't matter if the vehicle is still under warrantee. The dealer bills it back to corporation if it's warrantee work, so they don't really care.

If it's not under warantee, then the second dealer is correct in sending you back to the original dealer as they are responsable for performing poor work or installing faulty parts in the first place and as such are obligated to fix it to your satisfaction (you paid for the work after all, well if it wasn't under warrantee).

good luck

BJ
 

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Plus dealerships don't like to do warranty work if they don't have to... All manufactures only reimburse the dealerships at about 75% of the dealerships normal rates.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Great White said:
A valve float condition is when the valve closes and hammers off the valve seat. The spring has insufficeint clamping force to keep the valve from bouncing back up when it hits the seat. A broken spring will cause this condition as will as a sunken valve seat or sacked springs after many many miles.
In essence, you are correct. But if valve float is causing the problem, there is a mechanical failure of some sort. Not indicative by a problem that occurs at a certain road speed.
If it actually is true valve float, it will occur with rpm, regardless of road speed.

If the tsb describes your condition exactly, then take it to the dealer, see if they will fix it. A different dealer from the one that originally performed the repair shouldn't matter if the vehicle is still under warrantee. The dealer bills it back to corporation if it's warrantee work, so they don't really care.

If it's not under warantee, then the second dealer is correct in sending you back to the original dealer as they are responsable for performing poor work or installing faulty parts in the first place and as such are obligated to fix it to your satisfaction (you paid for the work after all, well if it wasn't under warrantee).

good luck

BJ
the first dealership performed the ticking lifter TSB. sincethe dealer "opened" the engine, the second dealer doesnt want to work on it. i dont think this is related to the stumble or is it?
 

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If it is still under warantee then the second dealer is just being a dick about it :sneaky2:. If it is still covered by the chrysler warantee, any authorized dealer can perform the work. Just because the first dealer opened the engine is not reason to refuse warantee work. If you follow thier reasoning then if one dealer changes a cam, then another doesn't have to change a failed rocker or timing chain.

They're just being difficult if it's under warantee. If they're being a dick about this simple thing, I recommend you find a better shop to perform the work as thier integrity is now in question. You probably don't want them working on your car if they have this type of attitude.

Cheers

BJ
 
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