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Woober Goobers!
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Looks like roller or needle bearing parts? I'm assuming they're steel and you picked them up with a magnet?
 

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Woober Goobers!
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???
 

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You'd think that whatever they came out of would be making a racket like a SoB and probably not able to carry out its function. What inside the 2.7 has a roller bearing in it? Water pump? Or do they have balls?
 
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Woober Goobers!
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Jasperengines.com
 

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Woober Goobers!
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So what originally happened that caused the commencement of the original repair? Might be a clue!
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Well timing chain went out, it didn't 'make a racket' just acted like it ran out of gas. Replaced the timing chain set up, thought i had it right the first go, but after all these no crank - no starts i busted it down again to redo timing. But putting it all together again, i ended up dropping a washer into the oil pan. So i fished the washer and all those mangled bearings out of the oil pan. Now i dont know if they were left from previous repairs from previous owners or what.
 

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I hit **** with sticks!
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Sooo... update... I redid the timing AGAIN. But on my venture of reinstalling a timing chain guide i lost a washer, so i fished in that little opening into the oil pan and procured these little bastards... im no genuis or a mechanic but id say it goes to something important that obviously needs replaced.... any ideas?
View attachment 41698
Well timing chain went out, it didn't 'make a racket' just acted like it ran out of gas. Replaced the timing chain set up, thought i had it right the first go, but after all these no crank - no starts i busted it down again to redo timing. But putting it all together again, i ended up dropping a washer into the oil pan. So i fished the washer and all those mangled bearings out of the oil pan. Now i dont know if they were left from previous repairs from previous owners or what.
Those could be timing chain pins from when the chain went out; or if there was a major failure with the water pump it could have been from that; I'm not sure exactly what kind of bearing is in the water pump, needle or roller, but its one or the other.

Have you done a compression test on the engine? Often when the timing chain goes "out" the valves hit the pistons and they bend; that would cause your no start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
No, not yet. But the left bank was out of time the first time I tried. Now i quit putting it together when i found those rollers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I dont know if anyone in this thread has heard a grenade launcher send one down range.. no not the explosion but that 'thump' once you pull the trigger.. my car sounds like that when trying to start. But i also dont have my exhaust either... straight pipe from the headers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Oil pump pully(?) wont line up to the other pulleys it needs to. Think those bearings could've came from it? Also how hard would it bet to replace that central pulley?

41709
 

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That's your crankshaft pulley. (Oil pump slips over the crankshaft, so by turning the crankshaft, the pulley does turn the oil pump.)

It looks like the crankshaft pulley is not on all the way. Pretty sure it should end up almost touching the timing cover. Have you torqued the crankshaft pulley bolt to spec.? Did you align the ID groove of the pulley with the dowel (keying bump) as you slipped it onto the crankshaft? Did the pulley seize up on the crankshaft before it fully seated under bolt torque?
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
So.. its seated as much as i can get it to against the timing cover. Somehow someway the crankshaft pulley has shifted forward. Idk if thats possible or im tripping. This so called 'mechanic' that was supposed to have done this job pulled the crankshaft pulley wheel from the crankshaft using punches and other wedge like material rather than a gear puller. Could that have tweaked the whole thing? Can I fix it as easily as he fcked it off? What should I do?!

P.s. i even spent about 20 minutes trying to hammer the crankshaft pulley back onto the crankshaft. No luck.
 

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You need to pull the pulley all the way on using the bolt, not a hammer except to get it started far enough to get enough thread engagement of the bolt so you don't strip out the first few threads in the crankshaft.

Read the rest of this post to cover all the bases without causing damage. If you were not using the bolt to pull it on, then that's probably explains it. You may not have enough swing room to get the pulley fully seated using just the hammer.

The pulley is made of 3 parts: The hub, which is the inner part, the outer ring , which the two belts ride on, and a rubber ring, which is compressed between the inner and outer parts. If the pulley was forced off by applying pressure to the outer ring, the outer ring would shift forward on the rubber ring. If that were the case, I would expect to see the inner part of the pulley in your photo sitting close to the timing cover, but perhaps the angle of view is not right to see that.

I have to think it has to be either the outer ring is shifted forward or the hub of the pulley is stuck on the crankshaft well before reaching its fully-seated position. I'd pull the pulley off with a proper puller (the kind that would not engage the outer ring) and, with it off see if you can see anything that would have caused it to bind up on the crankshaft (was the pulley rotated to the proper position to line its inner groove with the keying dowel?), or if the outer ring is out of position on the rubber ring and hub. Sometimes a pulley can tilt just a little instead of self-aligning and wedge itself on the shaft, or if there was any surface damage to the crankshaft that would cause the pulley to bind a up or wedge before fully seating. If that happened, you might find a deformed witness line on the crankshaft that you would need to clean up with a file (and rinse off with parts cleaner when you're done) so that it doesn't act as a snag point when you try to install the pulley again.

Put a thin layer of axle grease on the ID of the pulley and/or the crankshaft surface before re-installing the pulley to greatly increase the chances if it pushing all the way to its fully-seated home position without binding up.

Protect the pulley from direct impact from a hammer. Hammer it part of the way on with wood between the hammer and the pulley. The idea is to get it on far enough before using the bolt to pull it the rest of the way. If you start pulling with the bolt before there's enough thread engagement between bolt and crankshaft, you can strip out the threads in the crankshaft, and then you've created another problem. You could also get a bolt that is a little longer with the proper thread to start pulling the pulley on, and then switch over to the factory bolt when there would be at least 4 or 5 turns of thread engagement. I forget the thread size of the bolt, but of course it is metric, and it is the fine-thread version of that diameter. Probably only a well-stocked Ace hardware would have bolts of the right thread (maybe NAPA, maybe Lowes, but Ace is your best bet if there's one nearby).

Good luck.

EDIT: If you're going to get a longer bolt to start pulling the pulley on, the bolt thread is M14x1.5 (the 1.5 is the pitch). Length needs to be something like 15mm longer than the factory bolt - something in the range of 10 to 20mm longer should be about right - 10 might work, but 15 or more would be better to ensure good thread engagement. Too long, and it would bottom out before getting the pulley on far enough to switch over to the factory bolt. You could add in a couple or 3 washers if you have to get a bolt that is too long.
 

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You might get a loaner harmonic balancer puller from Advance or O'Reilly's. It's the proper tool to use to remove the pulley, but also, the big ring thing (on right side of photo) with the three lugs sticking up, called a rotation stopper, is the ideal thing to keep the crankshaft from rotating while tightening the bolt:

41710
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
You might get a loaner harmonic balancer puller from Advance or O'Reilly's. It's the proper tool to use to remove the pulley, but also, the big ring thing (on right side of photo) with the three lugs sticking up, called a rotation stopper, is the ideal thing to keep the crankshaft from rotating while tightening the bolt:

View attachment 41710
I have to think it has to be either the outer ring is shifted forward or the hub of the pulley is stuck on the crankshaft well before reaching its fully-seated position. I'd pull the pulley off with a proper puller (the kind that would not engage the outer ring) and, with it off see if you can see anything that would have caused it to bind up on the crankshaft (was the pulley rotated to the proper position to line its inner groove with the keying dowel?), or if the outer ring is out of position on the rubber ring and hub. Sometimes a pulley can tilt just a little instead of self-aligning and wedge itself on the shaft, or if there was any surface damage to the crankshaft that would cause the pulley to bind a up or wedge before fully seating. If that happened, you might find a deformed witness line on the crankshaft that you would need to clean up with a file (and rinse off with parts cleaner when you're done) so that it doesn't act as a snag point when you try to install the pulley again.
kudos peva, i finally caved and went and bought a cheap 3jaw puller from harbor freight.. then after breaking one of the jaws on one of the three sets that come in the box i decided to watch a video on how to do it. The outer ring is shifted somewhat. Now before i start hammering again, can i be fixed in that manner or do i need to replace it?
 

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I would think you can reposition the outer ring and that it would hold a new position without shifting. Obviously, try to get it as straight as possible to eliminate wobble. Aftermarket makes a new pulley for the 3.2/3.5, but not for the 2.7. If they did, I'd say just go get one, assuming they still had them.
 

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Are the threads truly stripped, or did using a traditional puller mess up the threads at the entrance of the hole? That's one reason not to use a traditional type puller on the crankshaft unless you do something (like use a washer) to protect the front of the crankshaft (especially the threaded hole) from damage by the tip of the puller screw.

If truly stripped, how deep in is/was the bolt when they stripped? IOW, is there some good thread left beyond where it stripped that the bolt will grab if you get the pulley further onto the crankshaft? Something that a longer bolt will fix if the stripping is with pulley already fully seated (if the hole is deep enough)?

Do you need to chase the threads with a tap to clean up damage to clear the way into the remaining length of good thread?
 
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